Where in the World MQ 2017 Challenge

I have spoken about Midsomer Quiltings 12×12 customer challenge in previous blogs but if you would like to read more about the challenge and what it was based on click here.


This years challenge is ‘Where in the World”…..

It will not come as any surprise to know that mine is based on a bird!  I recently watched the fabulous BBC series ‘Tribes, Predators & Me’ with nature photographer Gordon Buchanan.

All three parts were fabulous but I loved the story of the Eagle people of Mongolia.  These Kazakh nomads hunt on horseback with Golden eagles in the Altai mountains of Western Mongolia.

The aim was to set the bird into a backdrop that gave an idea of the tribesmen’s life.  This backing fabric helped to set the scene of a barren land of mountains and snow capped peaks, whilst also giving a subtle backdrop to the bird. A rose gold gilded sun added more interest to the backing.


I have painted a shadow outline of a distant horseman with his eagle on his arm, ready to hunt.

This is quite a different challenge for me as I love trying to capture the birds power and intensity through its eye and reflections.  On this occasion though I wanted to show the bird resting in the foreground with its hood on.

I chose a selection of fabrics to create the leather hand made hood.  I have started to hand stitch areas to help create the hand pieced effect.

I have started to stitch the bird and look forward to finishing the piece after half term.

As always the entries will be for sale via a secret auction to raise money for Dorothy House Hospice.  Its well worth a visit whilst the show is on.

All entries will be displayed at the shop every day from Friday, November 24th, until Monday, December 18th.

I look forward to posting images of the finished piece before delivering it to MQ for the exhibition.



MQ -Out with the old & in with the new!

Midsomer Quilting, the fabulous quilting shop on the Medips in Somerset has recently moved to bigger and better accommodation.  They are still based in Chilcompton but in a new location.  Directions can be found here.

After much planning and organising the shop closed at 4pm on Monday the 25th of September with the aim of re-opening on Friday the 29th (no mean task knowing the equipment and stock involved).  But, as always De, Birgetta & Chris did not want to disappoint potential customers by being closed so with the help of friends and loyal customers the epic task began.

Hundreds of bolts of fabrics were moved during Monday evening and shelving was removed from the old shop and reinstalled on the Tuesday in the new shop.

Chris, De, and Birgetta said they could not believe the kindness of everyone who offered help.  I sometimes feel they have no idea of how much they have supported, guided and befriended so many of their customers.  I would not be enjoying the success and down right fun of my new career had it not been for me meeting these three fabulous ex teachers.  Many of us owe them a huge amount of gratitude and feel lucky to count them as great friends.

They would love to see you at their new shop and can now even boast indoor loos ( only people who have previously visited can understand what a treat that is, especially during a workshop when it’s cold and wet).


They will shortly be opening an online shop too.  Check their website for details.




Long Tailed Tit & SAW

Following on from a late May post, my Long-tailed Tit piece is now complete and at the framers ready for Somerset arts Week.

This piece was based on a stunning photograph by Carl Bovis.  Carl is a Somerset Photographer who has a great blog that you can link to here.


This piece will be one of 6-7 originals that I will have on view and for sale at venue 19 during Somerset Arts week (23rd September – 7th October).


As well as originals there will be a selection of giclee prints and greetings cards.  I am exhibiting as part of a group alongside Casey Jon, Scarlett Martin, Suzy Parker, Angie Rooke, Sarah Truscott and Hannah Willow.  The art includes, textiles, weaving, ceramics and paintings.

Venue 19 can be found at North Wootton Village Hall, 5 Pilton Rd, North Wootton, Shepton Mallet, BA4 4ET

We are open everyday between Saturday 23rd September until Saturday the 7th of October 11am – 6pm.  I hope to be there as much as possible but will not be there everyday.

Hope you can pop along and see us.


Slender billed Curlew

Version 2

The first of the pieces based on the Slender billed curlews plight is now complete.  This work was inspired by the wonderful book ‘Orison for a Curlew’ by Horatio Clare.

I have absolutely loved researching this piece and trying new techniques such as simple fabric dying, beading, fabric painting and metal leaf.


Version 2

I’ve really enjoyed experimenting  with the background and how it could tell the story of this fated birds migratory route, which has led to its almost certain extinction.

Version 2

The final piece, incorporates a rock made up of small maps of the key areas listed in Horatio’s book.  Initially I had planned to make each area an individual stone but this looked cluttered.  The balance of telling the story and still creating an attractive piece of art was an interesting test.

Version 2

I have started to use the information and research I have gathered on this bird into another couple of pieces, I look forward to writing about these another day.


I absolutely love what I do, learning about these birds, the threats they face and their possible/probable extinction.  I do however find it incredibly sad that I will never run out of birds in this category and wonder what the future holds for nature in a man-made world.

As Horatio Clare says ‘ A world in which only the robust survive is a dulled and blunted planet; all crows, and no colour’


Slender billed curlew Pre-stitching progress.


I’ve been really busy creating since the building work finished at Easter.  A few pieces are complete and ready for framing, others are pieced and ready for stitching.  The thing I have totally neglected is my blog!  Apologies in advance that I am going to be playing catch up and that you will receive a number in quick (ish) succession!  I hope, once up to date on work done that I will be blogging in the moment…..

The work that has consumed most of my time has been a series of work on the probable extinction of the Slender billed curlew.  These pieces as previously discussed are based on the book ‘Orison for a Curlew’ by the wonderful Horatio Clare.


Above, the initial sketch and fabrics chosen for piecing the first art quilt. You can see I have shown both the front and back of a couple of the fabrics as the back was the most suitable for the areas in question.  Never forget to look at the back of fabrics, it can double the options you have when piecing.


Above, the bird pieced and ready to start adding fine details with fabric paint below.


Encouraged by the members of the quilt group I’m a member of, I decided to have a go with new techniques to create backgrounds.  I can highly recommend this photo paper for transferring images with an ink jet printer onto fabric.  Because the bird had such a hazardous migratory route I wanted to show these areas in map form.  I used images from a very out of date atlas and started experimenting.


Above you can see samples of these prints, before and after dying the fabric in a weak tea solution.  The idea is to stand the bird on a stone, hence the more natural colouring from the tea solution.


Below, experimenting with ideas for pebbles and stones around the main rock.


Although the image below is an ‘old moon’ rather than a ‘new moon’ I wanted to incorporate this image using metal leaf.  The slender billed curlew’s Latin name is Numenius tenuirostris meaning the ‘slim beak of the new moon’.  The image direction of the new moon didn’t work with the first piece so I’ve used a little artist licence!


Unfortunately my favourite pen (a Frixion, iron removable pen), which I usually highly recommend for sketching details as a guide to follow with thread, removed the dye from the backing fabric (you can see a white line around the moon).  This would not normally be a problem as I would thread paint over the area, however for marking out a circle that was only partly used it was an issue!


Below, second take on a slimmer crescent moon.


Samples done, the time was right to start planning the final piece, You can read more about this in the next blog.





First steps on a locally inspired project

The Common Crane Grus Grus

Despite not posting a blog in months, lots of things have been happening in the background.  Despite my life being consumed by 6 months of building work at home I have, slowly been working on a few new projects.

One of the projects for this years ‘Work in progress – Unfolding Stories 3’ at UWE will be based on the reintroduction of the Common Crane to the Somerset Levels.

Back in March my husband and I made a very early start to Slimbridge Wildfowl Trust in Gloucestershire.  We had booked onto a walking tour of the area with the aim of seeing some Common Crane (Grus Grus).   We were able to see a number of cranes in the wild around the site and then a few in captivity (ideal for someone like me who does not have a very powerful camera lens).

I so enjoyed researching the vulture and swallow pieces I made last year that I have decided to base a series of work for the 2018 exhibitions on birds with an interesting back story, whether that be reintroduction into the UK, threats of extinction/habitat loss or just a story that makes us marvel at what  their life involves.

The Common Crane seemed an obvious choice due to us living so close to an area that has seen the reintroduction of the bird onto the Somerset levels as part of the Great Crane Project.


My aim is to create a full body study of the Crane for one of the final pieces (not sure yet whether they will be in flight or on the ground) but I’ve started small and made some watercolour sketches of the head and neck.


Scott Petrek was our fabulous expert for the morning.  If you are on Twitter I recommend you following him.


Rather than start with my usual technique of piecing fabrics to build the basis of the bird structure I decided to experiment with fabric pens.  Using a very small number of colours and nib width I created a simple picture ready to stitch.  I enjoyed the freedom and speed of this technique but didn’t like the ink spreading gradually on the fabric and felt limited by the number of colours I had.

I have been encouraged by the members of the Contemporary Quilters West to experiment and try new techniques.  I’ve loved having a go, but have to say I love the piecing stage of my work a little too much to change yet!  That said, the end product of this quick experiment shown at the end of this post is so heavily stitched I do wonder if you could tell the difference!


Machine stitching over the painted outline.


I have enjoyed experimenting with a different foundation technique.  I look forward to creating the same picture using fabrics and comparing the results.


In the meantime I need to start sketching some outlines of the whole bird ready to start the larger piece over the coming months.


Our group will be at the West Country Quilt & Textile show from tomorrow until Sunday, this year, rather than having a gallery of finished work you can view our working studios, where a number of us will be demonstrating some of our techniques.  I will be there tomorrow morning, it would be great to meet you if you are coming along.

Thanks for reading and I look forward to updating you on progress.